Health care systems such as Kaiser Permanente have seen a “leveling off” of COVID-19 cases, with hospital admissions to intensive care units more manageable compared to previous weeks, the organization told the Business Journal in an email.

“We are absolutely ‘flattening the curve,’” said Dr. Nancy Gin, regional medical director of quality and clinical analysis for Kaiser Permanente Southern California. "We have seen a leveling off of admissions to the hospitals, including the ICUs, compared to two weeks ago."

Some hospitals are in communities with “significantly more” COVID-19 cases, Gin said, but the health system is not sure what accounts for the variation. Kaiser has been moving personnel and equipment to facilities within its network to where they’re needed most.

“The experience has been variable among our hospitals in terms of the volume of COVID-19 patients. Most of the caseload has been busy, but manageable,” Gin added.

Other health systems such as Providence St. Joseph Health and Dignity Health have revealed similar plans, along with suggesting patients get virtual care before trying to physically visit a site.

“Northridge Hospital has seen an increase in the number of COVID-19 patients needing care,” the Dignity hospital said in a statement. “We have the supplies, equipment and people needed to care for our patients. We are working quickly to secure any additional resources we may need as the situation evolves.”

Hospital representatives would not divulge cases per hospital, but the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has data broken down by city and suburb, and if a hospital or other health facility has reported at least one confirmed case of the virus.

Take Kaiser’s San Fernando Post Acute Hospital in Sylmar – the facility is on the county’s list as having at least one confirmed case admitted; the Los Angeles neighborhood has 107 cases reported to the county as of noon on Tuesday.

Looking ahead, hospitals expect bed availability to be manageable in the coming months, but that’s only if the rate of admissions remains steady, Gin said.