A $350 million bond measure that would pay for renovations or the creation of new facilities at Antelope Valley Hospital was unanimously approved on Monday by the Lancaster hospital’s public benefit corporation board for inclusion on the Nov. 6 ballot.

The bond measure would levy a property tax estimated at $25 per $100,000 of assessed property value to repay $350 million in funds that would be used to either retrofit existing buildings or construct new ones, including an expanded emergency department that would address the current problem of overcrowding. The hospital, which is in the midst of implementing a financial recovery plan, is grappling with the cost of coming into compliance with California’s seismic regulations by the 2030 deadline. The price to do so is more than $450 million, according to the hospital.

Without the funds from the ballot measure, the hospital will likely be forced to shut down at least some of its facilities, Antelope Valley Healthcare District Board Chair Kristina Hong said in a statement.

“For many years Antelope Valley hospital has made as many changes as previously possible to our emergency room and hospital facilities, but we need to take bold action now to modernize our medical center,” Hong said. “Additionally, California’s earthquake safety requirements could force us to shut down a large portion of our patient care areas if we don’t upgrade our facilities.”