Calling the San Fernando Valley a place of “doers, dreamers and innovators,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti laid out to area business leaders Friday afternoon how his administration is creating opportunity.

“It is a place that no matter where you come from … we will welcome you here,” Garcetti said.

Speaking to about 400 people at the Valley Industry & Commerce Association’s 2018 Business Forecast Conference at the Universal City Hilton hotel, Garcetti said that his economic development plan was based on three areas – identifying key industries, building up infrastructure and making sure that no resident was left behind.

Key industries identified by his administration included digital technology, health care, financial service, aerospace and entertainment. Infrastructure helps in creating jobs and will create more through transit programs funded by Measure M and at the Los Angeles International Airport, he added.

The third thing comes from having done the first two right and looking deep at the people who are being left behind. Garcetti detailed his plan to combat homelessness, which he called the “greatest moral and humanitarian crisis that we face.” Earlier in the week the city received $85 million from the state to assist the homeless.

“We got the check on Monday, deposited it on Tuesday and started spending it on Wednesday,” Garetti said. “We are going to end homelessness in this town,” he said to applause from the crowd.”

Garcetti hit some of the same highlights that he did three weeks ago at the United Chambers of Commerce of the San Fernando Valley’s 14th annual Mayor’s Luncheon. He told of a recent visit to rocket engine manufacturer Aerojet Rocketdyne and manufacturing incubator Toolbox LA, both in Chatsworth.

“We saw how technology is transforming multiple industries and how manufacturing is going to continue to power the economy here in the Valley and throughout the area,” Garcetti said.

He ended his speech asking for support on Measure W, which VICA opposes, a ballot initiative that will levy a special tax on property owners to be used for increasing stormwater capture and reducing urban runoff pollution which may increase water supply; and improve water quality.

“Taxes are tough, but investment makes a lot of sense,” Garcetti said.

Garcetti was one of two keynote speakers during the event. The other was Bret Lane, president and chief operating officer of Southern California Gas Co., who spoke about the importance of a balanced energy structure that is inclusive about using all forms of energy.