On-location film, television and commercial production decreased by more than 5 percent in the second quarter compared to a year ago, according to figures released Wednesday by FilmL.A.

The Hollywood nonprofit that coordinates location film permits in Los Angeles, unincorporated Los Angeles County and other jurisdictions, handled 8,978 on-location shoot days in April through June. In the same period a year earlier, it handled 9,466 shoot days.

Feature films and commercials saw shoot days go up in the second quarter, while other projects, such as music videos, still photography and student films, decreased by 8 percent. On-location television production went down by 15 percent to 2,953 shoot days.

A shoot day is one crew’s permission to film at one or more locations during a 24-hour period. FilmL.A.’s data does not include activity on soundstages or studio backlots.

FilmL.A. President Paul Audley again credited the state’s production tax incentives for creating an environment conducive to more filming in the Los Angeles region.

“While TV drama is down quarter to quarter, much of that is due to the production cycle of these shows which went on hiatus during the second quarter,” Audley said in a statement. “Increases in feature film, commercials and TV comedy production are very good news for the region’s economy.”

While overall on-location television production was down in the second quarter, an increase of 23 percent to 470 shoot days was seen in television comedies. Dramas were down by 9 percent, while reality programming was down by 32 percent.

On-location feature film production was up for a second quarter in a row, to 1,184 shoot days, or 11 percent, over the prior year.

Feature films receiving tax credits made up 136 shoot days, or more than 11 percent of the total shoot days. Films receiving credits included “Bumblebee,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and “Captain Marvel,” the first Marvel project to film in the state since “Captain America: Winter Solder” in 2014. Another contributor to feature films during the quarter was “Wine Country,” a Netflix film that shot heavily in the Los Angeles area.