Monday’s fire on the closed Colossus roller coaster at Six Flags Magic Mountain will not delay plans for the ride’s transformation into the Twisted Colossus, officials said Tuesday.

The 36-year-old wooden coaster will still be updated next year into a hybrid wooden-metal coaster and will open next spring, as originally scheduled.

“The incident yesterday had no effect to the renovation,” said Magic Mountain spokeswoman Sue Carpenter, in an email.

A small portion of the ride, which had been closed since Aug. 16, was damaged on Monday while work was being done to disassemble it. The park was not open and there were no injuries.

The Santa Clarita Sheriff’s Station reported that sparks from a welder’s torch started the fire, though the L.A. County Fire Department had not yet officially determined a cause of the fire.

“We’re working in conjunction with Magic Mountain on this. We just have to make sure everything adds up,” said county fire Inspector Scott Miller, who expected an official statement by Wednesday morning.

The fire took just under 40 minutes to extinguish. Thirty firefighters were dispatched at 1:32 p.m. and the crews called a knockdown by 2:08 p.m.

The four-minute Twisted Colossus ride will feature 5,000 feet of track, making it the longest hybrid coaster in the world. It would feature inversions where the train slows down upside down, an element where two trains pass through an overbanked turn facing each other, creating the illusion that riders can reach out and touch one another. It also will feature a 360-degree role and a 128-foot drop at 80 degrees.

Magic Mountain is owned by Six Flags Entertainment Corp., a publicly traded company in Grand Prairie, Texas.